Tag Archives for " Qualified Mortgage "

Private Non-QM Lenders Have Dropped Their Rates

https://i1.wp.com/cdn.americanbanker.com/media/gallery/p17vmmujkht5918m91cma9gu17fb8.jpg?resize=302%2C200Most lenders will only extend Qualified Mortgages. A Qualified Mortgage (“QM”) is a kind of loan having more stringent pre-qualification requirements. QM lenders must show the regulators that they have determined, prior to closing, that you, as a borrower, have the ability to repay your mortgage. This is logical, and will continue to be the norm for conservative lenders. Since these conservative lenders in turn have conservative investors who ultimately purchase your mortgage, their investors also want nothing to do with non-QM loans.

But if I lend you money at 6% (say 2% higher than conventional rates because of some additional risk) – there is no doubt that I already have an investor for the loan I just gave you who is willing to pay me, say, 6.5% for the same loan. Why would an investor do that? Because in a large financial market, he too has someone else on the line willing to pay him something more – and so on, and the business is profitable all around.

The old 12-13% “hard money” loans were being advanced to people having unfavorable credit when standard mortgage interest rates were at 5-6%. Now these non-QM lenders have lowered their rates to 6-8%, when today’s 30-year conventional rates have only dropped to about 4%. It’s not a bad deal to pay slightly higher non-QM rates for a brief period until you have satisfied your lender’s seasoning period requirement – and then you can refinance with a conventional mortgage without a prepayment penalty.

 

Here’s the Point: Interest rates for non-QM loans are a bargain right now. If your loan request was recently declined because of your credit history, there are lots of short and long-term financing opportunities available to you.

 

 

Tip the Scales in Your Favor: To Ensure Loan Approval

Your lender will eventually sell the loan they advance to you – it’s pretty much a given. They will do everything they can to “check the boxes” prior to approving your loan in order to make sure that either Fannie Mae will buy your loan, or that FHA will insure against the loss of principal.

Let’s say you just squeaked by with a Debt-To-Income Ratio of 43% (maximum percentage allowed under a Qualified Mortgage). Or, maybe your credit score just barely meets the lender’s minimum 620 requirement. Perhaps your income reduced over last year, and you know that the average earnings to support your loan will be tight.

Tip the ScalesIf the decision is too close to call, your loan will be declined – that’s just the way it is today. So here are some discretionary “Compensating Factors” that can help to persuade the underwriter to stamp “approved” on your loan application:

  • Avoid “payment shock” – i.e., when your proposed monthly mortgage payments are more than the current rent you pay (make sure you can verify the last 12 cancelled rent checks)
  • Maintain 2-3 credit cards paid “as agreed”, at balances that are well below your total authorized amount (and don’t cancel your unused credit cards – the older they are the better)
  • Come up with more than the minimum down payment (and demonstrate how you have been able to comfortably save your money – evidencing that you are prudent with your finances)
  • Don’t change jobs too much – unless your income improves (especially with commission earnings)
Here’s the Point: Sometimes only one “Compensating Factor” will persuade the underwriter that you are a good credit risk – thereby improving your chances of getting loan approval.